Occam’s razor and Golf

Occam’s razor (also Ockham’s razor or Ocham’s razor) is the problem-solving principle that the simplest solution tends to be the right one. “When presented with competing hypotheses to solve a problem, one should select the solution with the fewest assumptions”.
When presented with the challenge of how to formulate an instructional curriculum for physically or mentally challenged golfers, we quickly realized that coming up with a program that made it easier for challenged players to be introduced to the game or improve their existing game, would entail moving away from traditional methods and focusing on simple and logical concepts.


The Challenge

What is the single biggest challenge for vision or physically challenged  golfers?  Putting the club head on the ball consistently!   With traditionally designed golf clubs, you have thirteen lengths, thirteen different lies, and thirteen different weights….ergo thirteen different swing planes.  Does that make sense if you’re trying to have the fewest assumptions?  Of course not.  Therefore, why not create a two plane system that allows the challenged golfer to only master two swings, irons/hybrids and woods?  Traditional logic enforces the notion that variable length irons are correct and that smart people before us deciphered the most accurate way to play the game. Yet, few have questioned the reason why our clubs variate in length.  In golf terms, a set of clubs that allows the player to maintain a single ball position, swing plane, and rhythm rate would provide the logical explanation to achieve optimal performance. All with a club that has singularity of length, weight, bounce, shaft weight, and shaft flex to optimize the simplicity of repeating your ideal swing.
Over the past 10 years, single length clubs have advanced from a curiosity to a major manufacturer offering.  Single length irons are being offered by Cobra, Edel, and a couple of component builders.  Single length woods and hybrids are offered by Cobra, 1Iron and Pinhawk.  On the high end, Edel offers custom fit irons (only) that are unique in that the emphasis is on the custom shaft design.  From the Edel website: “Pre-Loaded for fiber tension according to flex, weight and shaft profile. Each single length iron shaft combines strategically positioned variable kick and balance points with gradient torque and frequency progression. Optimizing launch conditions independent of clubhead loft, insuring the golfer of an optimal fit option throughout a set of single length irons. Paderson Kinetixx Loaded Single Length iron shafts are an innovative three (3) shaft constant weight design. Long, Mid and Short shaft profiles are designed to harmonize trajectory and optimize distance gapping in all corresponding lofts.Mirroring performance of the mid irons, long irons are finally easy to hit and more forgiving. Flying higher and longer with more spin and increased ball speed as compared to conventionally built sets of irons having longer playing lengths and lighter head weights. The shorter iron profile generates precise distance and target control accuracy; optimizing launch conditions and playability as never before seen in a set of irons.”. Learn more about these clubs here at http://edelgolf.com. On the low end, Pinhawk offers a solid game improvement club with customized lengths (+/- 1/4”, 1/2” increments), multiple shafts, grips, and lie adjustment to fit just about any player.  You can buy components or completely assembled clubs at a very reasonable price (assembled are $49 per club).  In addition, other than 1Iron, Pinhawk is the only one to offer single length fairway woods and hybrids.  Overall, a pretty strong lineup and in our opinion, a great place for the cost conscious who are looking to get into the SL game.  You can find more information at http://www.pinhawkgolf.com.  While Sterling and 1Iron both have had positive reviews, if you’re looking for a major brand with the reputation and development prowess to match, you really can’t go wrong with Cobra.  Both the F7, F8 and now King SZ, single length irons are strong contenders for best single length system.  With the recent success of Bryson DeChambeau, rest assured that Cobra will continue to innovate with the new features to increase their market share.  The great thing about Cobra is that you can build your own custom setup with multiple shafts, grips, lengths and club setup at no extra cost over retail.  Also, Cobra is now offering SL Hybrids that can replace your 3,4,5, even 6 iron with a club that is not only easier to hit, but with the lower CG gives you the ability to get more height on your mid-long iron clubs (common complaint among first time SL users).  Overall, we feel that Cobra is the best place to start your SL experience from a solid company and at a very reasonable price.  You can find more information at http://www.cobragolf.com.

Occam’s Razor….it’s with this principle that TeeItUp is entering into the sight and physically challenged golf world to provide instruction, tools, and opportunities for both challenged youth and adult golfers of all ages, with our new program “You Don’t Have to See It, 2TeeItUp©”.  Most importantly, we will have a decided focus on sight and physically challenged youth to introduce them to the game and the values of golf, which in itself will allow us to continue our mission to bring new golfers of all abilities to the game.  Stay tuned for Edition 2 of our four part series, Using Technology to Improve Your Game.

We are now part of Team Cobra Golf

Speedzone ONe

It’s with great pride and appreciation that we announce Cobra-Puma  is now a supporter/supplier of TIU4ALL and is the preferred golf club and soft goods provider to the UArizona Adaptive Golf program.

TIU4ALL executive director Jon Moore stated, “It’s the support of major golf manufacturers such as Cobra-Puma that will help in making adaptive golf a mainstream sport and increase awareness of these unique athletes.  Our ultimate goal is to not only make golf accessible, but to further the inclusion of golf in the Paralympics as quickly as we can.   For the adaptive golf world, Cobra offers more options and logical choices in equipment given that we have so many different ability participants.  The advent of single length irons and the most advanced variable length irons, coupled with ground breaking technology in metal woods, we feel that with their great fitting program,  we have the most focused offering available for adaptive golf.” Riley Bauman of Cobra/Puma Golf added, “Cobra Puma Golf is excited to support Tee It Up 4 All and their adaptive Golf initiatives. While golf has a rich history of teaching etiquette and life lessons, it also lends the opportunity to reach all types of players to get outside, stay active and interact with fellow golfers. The beauty of this game is that we can never capture it, we only experience it. No matter where you are on your journey, there is so much to be learned. When we took a look at what Jon Moore is doing we knew we wanted to be a part of it. We pride ourselves at CPG on building top tier product for game enjoyment and we know that is across all types or swings and skill level. With Jon’s needs, we believe the simplicity we have created in our portfolio of high performing product makes so much sense when some of our players face so many other variables on the course allowing the clubs to be less of a question mark and more a resource. And despite what the scorecard says, we can also help you look your best with top tier performance apparel, footwear and accessories. Look your best, feel your best. We know our company mantra of “Enjoy Golf” will shine through as we proudly support Tee It Up 4 All and their goals in the adaptive golf landscape.”  

Additionally TIU4ALL is now starting an instructional and competitive program for the tri-state area (Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado) that will focus on youth, Tribal, and wounded veterans that will have a wide reaching effect on helping our target participants in realizing their life goals, equity, education, opportunities, and hopefully, a bright future.  You can find out more information at “www.tiu4ALL.org/programs”. 

TIUTP Event Updates

The TIU Shootout 2021

We are pleased to announce that as of 3/5/2021, the TIU4All Shootout to benefit UArizona Adaptive Athletics is officially sold out with 144 golfers committed to play.  While we still have a couple of sponsorships available, we have exceeded expectations and will be proud to post the results of the biggest single day benefit golf tournament ever in Southern Arizona.  This benefit will feature many of the most prominent business leaders in the Tucson market and will show case the Ambassadors of the Adaptive Golf Players Association, who showcase and demonstrate the unique abilities that world ranked adaptive golfers possess.

The Conquistador Paragolf Championships

We have been making tremendous progress on the participant and sponsor fronts, but we need to “up our game” in getting more signups as we’re getting close to cutoff dates on the room blocks as well as golf entrants.  We are extending the registration cutoff date from 03/12/21 to 03/26/21 for both tournament registration and hotel room blocks at Casino del Sol.  If you register after this date we cannot guarantee the rate or availability. In conjunction with our competition committee, we will be making decisions on the applicable tee boxes for each group of classifications within the next month. If you need further information, please email us at sales@tiu4all.org.  

The Tip of the Spear to benefit fallen Special Forces Veterans

New to TIUTP tournament schedule this year is the Tip of the Spear Corporate Golf Clinics and 18 hole benefit tournaments (organized by the Invisible Shield) .  In partnership with Dormie Networks, we will be starting out with our first event at Briggs Ranch in San Antonio, TX with a second benefit this fall to be held at a Dormie Network course yet to be chosen.  The format of each event will be a corporate sponsored golf clinic presented and operated by the Patriot Golf Foundation, with an 18 hole shotgun tournament operated by TIU4ALL the day following. Net proceeds from both events will be donated to qualified charities and foundations in the immediate market.

The Invisible Shield National Championships – updates coming this next week.

New sponsors, alliances, and paths

TIU4ALL is proud to announce our new alliances with Sqairz golf shoes, Vice golf balls, SoloRider adaptive golf carts, and Cobra/Puma Golf as our new sponsors and exclusive providers of golf apparel and equipment. “Our involvement with these golf industry leading manufacturers allows us to assist adaptive golfers everywhere and our collegiate adaptive student athletes the opportunity to not only improve their golf future through best of class equipment but continue their pursuit of life excellence that only the game of golf can provide. With the advent of our mission to establish a national adaptive golf conference along with our ongoing efforts to provide clinics, instruction, and mentoring in adaptive golf in the state of Arizona, these additions to our dedicated supporters will only be a positive on all fronts” stated TIU4ALL executive Director, Jon Moore. Mr. Moore further states, “These and the other alliances we’re currently developing, will only enhance the program and our ability to develop additional opportunities in adaptive golf as well as further develop recruitment opportunities for the UArizona Adaptive Golf program”.Further information on our new alliances can be found here:

www.sqairz.com

www.vicegolf.com

www.solorider.com

www.cobrapumagolf.com


For further information on TIU4ALL, go to https://www.teeitup.net or https://www.tiu4ALL.org

Another pertinent mental golf plan by Dr. Bob Rotella….a genius on the six inches between your two ears

01 Believe you can win.

I still remember my first major, the 1985 city championship in Charlottesville, Va. Back then I didn’t play a lot of golf, but I wanted to see how good the players in my town were. I shot in the 80s and finished third from last. When I got done, I decided to follow the leaders so I could see how my game compared. After watching them for 18 holes, my evaluation was this: They hit it farther than I did. They hit it straighter. Their bunker play was fantastic. And they chipped and putted better. But I left there believing that if those guys could win, so could I. I worked on my game, and over time I got better, including one winter when all I did each day after work was hit bunker shots. Eight years after I first competed, I made a 12-foot putt on 18 to win my city championship.

02 Don’t be seduced by results.

How can Trevor Immelman get to the 18th green of the final round of the 2008 Masters and not know where he stands? It’s called staying in the present, and it’s a philosophy I teach all the players I work with. It means not allowing yourself to be seduced by a score or by winning until you run out of holes. Instead, you get lost in the process of executing each shot and accept the result.

Before Trevor teed off on Sunday with a two-shot lead, he decided he wouldn’t look at leader boards. He had a plan: Pick a target, visualize the shot and let it rip. As Trevor walked up the 18th fairway, Brandt Snedeker put his arm around him and nudged him to walk ahead. Trevor told me it was the first time all day he allowed himself to think about the outcome. After marking his ball, he asked his caddie how they were doing. His caddie said he had a three-stroke lead over Tiger. Trevor said he went from being quiet and calm inside to thinking, How can I not five-putt this?

03 Sulking won’t get you anything.

The worst thing you can do for your prospects of winning is to get down when things don’t go well. If you start feeling sorry for yourself or thinking the golf gods are conspiring against you, you’re not focused on the next shot. When Padraig Harrington won the British Open in 2007, he got up and down for a double-bogey 6 on the last hole to make a playoff after knocking two balls into the water. Padraig told me he had a level of acceptance that earlier in his career he didn’t have. He said it never entered his mind that he might blow the tournament. His only thought was getting his ball in the hole so he could win the playoff.

04 Beat them with patience.

Every time you have the urge to make an aggressive play, go with the more conservative one. You’ll always be OK. In a tournament, the rough is thicker, the pins are tougher, and the greens are faster. The moment you get impatient, bad things happen.

The best example of patience I ever witnessed was Tom Kite at the 1992 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Kite had been 0 for 20 in U.S. Opens until then. On Sunday, wind gusts reached 35 miles per hour, but Kite didn’t get flustered. On a day when a lot of players didn’t break 80, Kite shot even par and won by two. In tough conditions, stay patient and let others beat themselves.

05 Ignore unsolicited swing advice.

Not too long ago, I was working with this player who was struggling. But a couple of strong finishes had him feeling better. At the next tournament he makes, like, eight birdies in the first round. Now he’s feeling really good. He stops by the putting green to hit a few, and a player he knows walks up to him and says: “I don’t know what you’re doing with your putting, but that’s not the way you used to set up.” A few minutes later another player comes over: “You don’t have your eyes over the ball the way you used to.” Now my guy doesn’t know what to think. He went from making everything he looked at to being a mess the next day.

You’ll have lots of well-meaning friends who want to give you advice. Don’t accept it. In fact, stop them before they can say a word. Their comments will creep into your mind when you’re on the course. If you’ve worked on your game, commit to the plan and stay confident.

06 Embrace your golf personality.

Some players like Anthony Kim love to socialize on the course. Others like Retief Goosen keep to themselves. The key is to find what works best for you. The toughest player, mentally and emotionally, I’ve ever worked with is Pat Bradley, the LPGA Tour Hall of Famer. She was like Ben Hogan — she didn’t talk to anybody when she played. She told me she didn’t have time to chat with players because she had an ongoing dialogue with herself. I still remember the day she called to tell me she was done. She’d been on the range before a tournament giving tips to other players. Later, on the first few holes, she found herself chitchatting with her playing partners. “I can’t play golf this way,” she told me. “I’m done. I’ve accomplished everything I wanted to accomplish.”

07 Have a routine to lean on.

I tell players to follow a mental and physical routine on every shot. It keeps you focused on what you have to do, and when the pressure is on, it helps you manage your nerves. A pre-shot routine helped Curtis Strange win his first U.S. Open, in 1988. Afterward he went home and watched the tape with his wife and kids. He told me they kept commenting on how cool and calm he looked. Curtis said to me: “I’m thinking, Who in the world are they talking about? They can’t be talking about me. I couldn’t get any moisture in my mouth. My heart was jumping out of my chest.” Curtis said he had so much emotion in his body it was unbelievable. He was working his tail off just to stay in the present, hit one shot at a time and not think about what it would mean to win the U.S. Open.

It’s easy to build up a tournament into something so huge that you can’t play.’

08 Find peace on the course.

When you practice hard and admit to yourself that you really want to win, it’s easy to build up a tournament into something so huge that you can’t play. I’ve seen amateurs not used to competing arrive two hours before their tee time and try to rebuild their golf swings. They become panicked practicers and try to perfect every area of their game. They get themselves so tied up in knots it’s ridiculous. Tour players do this, too. I’ve seen guys come to Augusta, rent a big house and invite their family and friends. When Thursday comes around, they start worrying: What if I miss the cut and disappoint everyone? The golf course has to be your sanctuary, the thing you love, and you can’t be afraid of messing up.

09 Test yourself in stroke play.

I’m a big believer that stroke play is real golf. I know lots of people who are good in matches who can’t play a lick at stroke play. But most guys who are good at stroke play also thrive in matches. When you have to count every shot, it’s a tougher game. Too often guys go out as a foursome and play “our best ball against your best ball.” That has its place, but stroke play makes you mentally tough.

10 Find someone who believes in you.

The greatest thing I’ve got going for me is my ability to believe in other people’s talents. I can see people doing things they can’t see themselves doing. Every champion needs that. Hogan once told me he considered quitting the game several times early in his career because he didn’t think he was providing for his wife the way he should. But Valerie wouldn’t let him quit. She knew he’d never be satisfied until he won majors. Having confidence in yourself is important, but it helps to have someone who believes in you, too, whether it’s a spouse, a friend, a teacher, or even a sport psychologist.